Inciter | Blog Masonry
40572
blog,paged,paged-7,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,select-child-theme-ver-1.0.0,select-theme-ver-1.7.1,smooth_scroll,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.11.2.1,vc_responsive

Out of School Time Programs in Baltimore City

by Sheila MatanoThe Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC) recently released a new report on schools in Baltimore City that provide out-of-school time activities. All the schools in the reports were funded under the Community Schools Initiative at the Family League of Baltimore City.One of the key outcomes for the OST programs was attendance; the report showed students who attended OST on a regular basis had a slightly higher school attendance rate than their peers who did not (95.0% compared to 93.0%).[1]Another key outcome was that students who attended OST were significantly less likely to be chronically absent[2] from school in 2011-12 than their peers; 62% of regular OST attenders were no longer chronically absent compared to 51% of their comparable peers. In other words, the number of regular OST attenders who...

Read More

Secrets from the Data Cave, November 2013

by Sarah McCrudenWelcome to CRC’s monthly series of articles on all things techie: Secrets from the Data Cave! (For those who don’t know, the title references our room -- fondly referred to as “the bat cave”--- where data staff can geek out in an isolated setting.) Here we'll be offering you a fascinating sneak peek into the cave, with the latest updates & tips on what we’re implementing here at CRC!November 2013: Why I’m Switching to DecafI’m kind of obsessed with tracking my progress to goals. And not just goals at work, or long-term goals in my personal life—I mean little, day-to-day things. I’ve even been known to track the amount of time I spend cleaning my apartment each day, because without documentation to keep me accountable, I would simply never...

Read More

AEA 2013 Re-Cap, Part 1

compiled by Jill ScheiblerCRC was well represented at the 2013 American Evaluation Association conference, held close to home for us in Washington, DC! We learned a lot from this year’s sessions and had a great time connecting with old and new friends… But we didn’t just party there! (Although we did do just a bit of that with our fellow East Coast evalutors… see the evidence at the end of this post.)Most of our staff attended AEA 2013, and each has something to share about what she learned there. Together we have so much to share, actually, that we’ll be splitting our conference post-mortem into two parts. Stay tuned for part 2, coming next week! Dana Ansari, Research Assistant, attended a plenary presented by John Easton, entitled, “The Practice of Educational Evaluation Today: A Federal Perspective.” Her...

Read More

Secrets from the Data Cave, October 2013

Introducing. . . Secrets from the Data Caveby Sarah McCruden Welcome to CRC’s new monthly series of articles on all things techie: Secrets from the Data Cave! For those who don’t know, the title references the room in our office where the data staff can geek out in an isolated setting that is fondly referred to as “the bat cave.” We will be offering you a sneak peek into this fascinating environment every month with the latest updates and tips on what we’re implementing here in the CRC data cave!October 2013: Beware the Pumpkin PieThis month’s topic— how to effectively represent data based on basic principles of visual perception, as discussed in Stephen Few’s Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten. This volume, basically a textbook, covers more info...

Read More

Evaluation communication and audience considerations

by Dana AnsariDuring the brief time I’ve worked as an evaluator, for various projects I’ve had to report on different types of information in different formats and structures. Given that I’ve had limited-to-no access to the actual databases for these projects, I typically have had to request needed information from the project staff members who have access to it. As a result, the data I receive is mostly in raw format, lengthy and complicated to understand at a glance. However, with time and follow up questioning, I’ve been able to extract what I need from within the numbers. Of course, the work is still far from over.I then have had to filter, sort, organize, and restructure the data so that my audience can understand it without being confused or bored...

Read More

Theory-driven & process evaluation: The art of getting inside and beyond the “black box”

by Jill ScheiblerBefore working in program evaluation, I received education and training as a clinician, specifically as an art therapist. Through my work as an art therapist, which was based in a personal belief in and, more importantly, empirical observations supporting the mental health-promoting effects of making art, I became curious about how to demonstrate arts impacts to the general public (including dubious funders and policymakers) and found a lack of relevant research to back up what I’d seen in practice. At the same time, I talked to numerous art therapists and community artist-practitioners who were doing good work with vulnerable populations in my city of Baltimore, all around the U.S., and throughout the world. The individuals I talked to all voiced their need to “prove” the value of their...

Read More

The Cryptic Problem of Encryption

by Sarah McCrudenSo you’ve compiled some raw data for your next big report, or, you’ve come across a few clients’ records that have errors that need to be addressed. If you need to share these tasks with a coworker, email is often the most convenient method for sharing: just attach and send! Sounds simple. But, have you ever wondered just how the email makes its way to the recipient—and whether it’s really safe on its journey there?According to Leo Notenboom, a personal computer and software industry expert, concerns about email interception may be exaggerated: “It is possible to sniff and eavesdrop on email conversations. It's also not particularly easy, unless you're on an open WiFi connection.” Yet, he goes on to say that, “by default, the contents of email is...

Read More

Guest Blog: Thinking like Aesop to Visualize Theory of Change

by Thomas Kelly, Jr. What are theories of change meant to do? As evaluators, we need to define what it is we   are examining and measuring—naming outcomes, uncovering assumptions, describing cause and effect relationships, and articulating the pathway of change intended by the program implementers. This diagram of the logic and belief about how our efforts will achieve impacts is used to measure the progress of work, and to test the validity of what we really know about the world and our role in changing it.We expect our theory of change to communicate the importance of the key concepts of the model, our ideas of interconnection and causality, and how we think we can respond to and change the many variables around us. This graphic boxes-and-arrows representation of our logic is one way of...

Read More

Pick up the Baby. Look at the Baby. Talk to the Baby.

by Taj Carson, PhDLast week, we were talking to a prominent early childhood expert. We were trying to map out the pathways for children to develop good reading skills by the time they reached third grade (no small task). We had factored in instructional techniques, summer reading programs, and attendance initiatives, all of which have clear connections to literacy in school-aged children. In looking at the things that predict school success from birth to five years of age, however, it became a lot harder. Nutrition, health, whether there are books in the home; all kinds of things impact whether a child is ready to go to school.After talking for a while, our colleague sighed heavily--the kind of sigh that comes from spending years working on an issue, convening and serving...

Read More

Reducing the Price of Hospital Readmission

by Tracy DusablonThe Hospital Readmission Reduction Program is part of the Affordable Care Act, which has ignited heated debates both for and against the program. The program aims to improve quality of care and lower costs by reducing hospital readmissions for Medicare patients. To accomplish this, hospitals are essentially ‘dinged’ when patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge, and these ‘dings’ turn into financial penalties for the hospitals. As it currently stands, the penalty is one percent of hospital payments, and is set to increase to three percent by 2015.So, how are hospitals dealing with this new policy, which took effect in October 2012? To some extent, they may just be accepting the penalties, chalking it up to the expense of doing business. On a more constructive end, some...

Read More